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For Release — Friday, March 19, 2004

NEW CENSUS DATA SHOW NEW YORK LOSING GROUND
TO THE NATION IN POPULATION GROWTH

ALBANY—New population estimates show New York losing ground to the nation in several critical age ranges, according to a Public Policy Institute analysis of new data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The data add to the evidence suggesting that New York's long-term economic travails may be impelling an increasing number of New Yorkers to become former New Yorkers, The Institute's analysis shows.

The U.S. Census Bureau recently released population estimates for all states and the nation as of July 2003, as well as population data from April 2000. In that span, the Census Bureau estimates that New York gained 213,294 in overall population. That is a growth rate of just 1.1 percent, which is only the 44th-fastest growth rate in the nation. That growth rate is well behind the national average growth rate of 3.3 percent. Nevada is the fastest-growing state, at 12.2 percent.

New York ranked 46th in growth among young adults and 49th among those aged 15 to 44 - those preparing to enter the workforce and those considered in the prime creative years of their careers. And among children five years old or younger, New York ranked dead last in growth, behind 49 states and the District of Columbia.

"We know that New York's population growth has long trailed the nation's, and studies have shown that population tends to go where the economic climate creates the most opportunity," said Business Council President Daniel B. Walsh. "This latest alarm offers still more evidence that New York must try to stem the tide by making New York more economically attractive."

The Institute, the research affiliate of The Business Council, analyzed the new Census Bureau data to show that:

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